i fall asleep to a stranger whispering to me. it’s not weird, i swear.

i fall asleep to a stranger whispering to me. it’s not weird, i swear.

asmr research paper, final. due december 17th, 2018. // alice bodge, allison, FILM208

In 2011, I was in bed, unable to sleep. I went on YouTube to search up “relaxing video”, and stumbled onto a video titled Nurse (soft spoken). Obviously perplexed, I watched the video of a woman pretending to give the viewer a checkup — I had never seen anything like it. A woman whispering into her camera was so strange yet fascinating to me, which inspired me to look into it. I ended up discovering an entire community on the Internet: ASMR.

ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response, and is known for the infamous and sometimes unsettling videos created on YouTube, from whispering young women to outlandish alien roleplays.Screen Shot 2018-12-15 at 12.29.37 PM John Cline describes the sensation of ASMR as “the experience of tingling sensations in the crown of the head, in response to a range of audio-visual triggers such as whispering, tapping and hand movements”.

This is a formal way to explain the relaxation one may get from “satisfying” noises or other feelings; a friend doing your makeup or scratching your back can give you ASMR, as well as someone typing on their computer — it ranges from visual triggers to sound, with plenty of little things in between.

It’s important to note, too, that while the formal definition constitutes ASMR as giving one tingles, it also applies to those who simply get a pleasant feeling from relaxing videos. Personally, I have never felt tingles, but certain ASMR videos will actually help me fall asleep. I don’t tend to tell all of my friends this, but there was a time where it even mortified me that I could fall asleep to a woman whispering to me.

While ASMR may be a popular topic on social media nowadays, this wasn’t always the case. Though for years I’ve been keeping up with the growth of ASMR, I had been embarrassed to bring it up to friends until recently. This embarrassment came from how unique and unusual the phenomenon was; a stranger whispering into their camera in attempts to comfort you isn’t the easiest idea to get on board with. I knew others would find it as strange as I did, so I kept quiet until ASMR recently came into the spotlight.

comments on Gentle Whispering ASMR’s What is ASMR? video below:

 

Digital media has overtime grown the community into what it is now, popularizing it and breaking the “creepy” stigma it held in the early years. Digital media is responsible for the birth and growth of ASMR; forums and online communities formally created it, platforms like YouTube fostered the growth, and large social sites such as Twitter popularized it.

Screen Shot 2018-12-15 at 12.38.43 PM
w magazine’s celebrity ASMR page

Different types of digital media were used together in order to make this community into a popular part of pop culture. One can see ASMR infiltrating into pop culture today, through Twitter memes, celebrity interviews and YouTube reaction videos.

But ASMR wasn’t always the household name that it is today. The birth of ASMR, according to Craig Richard on his History of ASMR website, dates back to 2007. A post titled Weird sensation feels good was published on the forum steadyhealth.com, which sparked a conversation about the feelings associated with ASMR (Richard). Through this forum, people who experienced tingles could feel less alone; through a digital communal platform, a community was formed, naming the feeling “attention induced head orgasm” (Long). AIHO was discussed through forums, and by 2010, a sizable community was grown.

AIHO wasn’t the best choice of words, however; these videos of people, typically women, whispering into cameras at a close angle was commonly taken sexually (some people today still view the videos as sexual). With a name like “head orgasm”, the view of ASMR  or AIHO only became more negative. In 2010, Jennifer Allen, a member of the community who also experienced tingles, decided to create the term ASMR in order for the group to be taken more seriously (Richard).

This was revolutionary for the ASMR community; those who felt it now had an official way to communicate about triggers and feelings, and content creators could start labeling their videos as ASMR.

This label made it much easier to consume ASMR content on YouTube. Imagine not knowing the name of your favorite YouTuber, and having to type in their attributes and qualities of their videos. If you were a fan of Emma Chamberlain, for example, and didn’t know her name, you’d have to type in “funny youtuber brunette”.

clearly, emma chamberlain isn’t coming up on this search:

Screen Shot 2018-12-12 at 6.55.45 PM.png

This struggle is what ASMR fans had prior to Allen coining a legitimate name for it. People would have to search up Bob Ross videos, or find a medical exam where the doctor conveniently was speaking quietly. After 2010, fans were able to simply type ASMR into their search engine to watch anything they wanted.

Allen’s formalization of the term ASMR in turn formalized the community following it, thus giving people a language to discuss it with (Long). Rebecca Long states that “there is no record of ASMR existing until a few years ago because people had no way of talking about it”. This rings true, further proving how digital media as simple as online forums can spark movements such as ASMR — it also shows how trends truly do not exist until they’re born online.

After the initial formalization of ASMR on Reddit and other forums, the community started to grow steadily. Richard’s History of ASMR explains that after the first wave of forums and subreddit posts made, Long created a Facebook page for members of the online community to join, further pushing the growth.

While smaller scale, communally based platforms were used to birth ASMR, broader spreads of digital media started to attract more ASMR fans, and simply people interested in the concept (such as myself). By 2015, journals, articles, and a documentary were all produced on the unique whispering videos. Digital media isn’t limited to social platforms; media such as online journals or films brought light to ASMR and pushed its exponential growth along.

Those who weren’t turned off by its seemingly sexual nature were fascinated in the different kinds of relaxing videos, and plenty of ASMR community members started to create their own content. YouTubers such as Gentle Whispering ASMR and Heather Feather dominated the early content created (channels pictured above), but soon plenty of fans were enticed to create content — this ended up further growing ASMR even more.

YouTube is the main site that fostered the growth of ASMR, and it’s not hard to understand why. Rob Gallagher states that “it makes sense that web users increasingly look to platforms like YouTube for solace, affirmation and relaxation”, and it’s clear why — YouTube is the perfect platform for ASMR because of how accessible it is both to viewers and those who want to create content. I found in my creative project that it was almost too easy to pick up a camera, film myself tapping objects around the room, and post it. This process took about thirty minutes — which is nothing compared to the days of preparation that popular and professional ASMRtists commit to.

Early ASMR videos were simple; I can recall around 2011 watching sound assortments with dim lighting and basic triggers. However, a search for ASMR videos today will show numerous high quality videos, ASMRtists using professional lighting and microphones specifically built for their craft.

side by side comparison of a 2011 nurse roleplay vs. a 2018 nurse roleplay

 Technology adapted to ASMR, finding ways to improve a viewer’s experience — this use of technology also shows an ASMRtist’s quality. One of the early “queens of ASMR” is ASMRrequests, famous with three million views for a high quality, revolutionary video posted. The editing was impressive, with digital features and her in a detailed costume. ASMR videos and improving technology went hand in hand.

Yet aesthetics isn’t all there is to making a legitimate ASMR video, and digital media also provided a platform for constructive criticism. ASMR videos evolved and improved because of the community discussion on digital media platforms like Reddit. In Eliciting Euphoria Online: The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture, Gallagher discusses the upvote and downvote feature on the r/ASMR page. Screen Shot 2018-12-15 at 1.05.55 PM.pngASMR fans would use this feature in order to rank the most effective videos; this rank was purely based on how well the video did its job. Gallagher explains that “this [feature] is measured via feedback mechanisms (comments, views, ‘likes’, upvotes) linking audiences to uploaders and ASMRtists”. Digital media platforms like Reddit created a link from viewers to the ASMRtist; it also plays into the participatory affordance that Janet Murray is known for discussing.

Because viewers have a platform to up or downvote videos they deem effective or not, ASMRtists are able to take the feedback and “tune their aesthetic strategies accordingly” (Gallagher). YouTube allows ASMRtists to create their own content, but Reddit gives the viewers influence over the content they see.

By 2016, ASMR as a community and genre had grown vastly due to articles, interviews and other media focused on it. Brands such as W Magazine were posting videos with household names like Cara Delevingne or Aubrey Plaza, who were interviewed while creating ASMR. However, Twitter was the final push that the genre needed to be in the spotlight.

pictured below, Angelica and Life with Mak created into popular Twitter memes:

Memes started to be created about ASMRtists, and by 2018, they were going viral with people joking about them in casual conversation. Typically, Internet genres and phenomenons that are made into memes are mocked heavily and cast off as “ridiculous” or “dumb”, thus why they were made into a joke.

Yet, after the memes created about ASMR, the topic didn’t become even more taboo — the opposite happened. The amount of ASMRtists was growing and the stigma surrounding the videos seemed to become less harsh. Personally, a year ago, I would’ve never felt comfortable enough to openly discuss ASMR or even create my own video for class, but because of the spotlight put on it and memes created, it surprisingly became socially acceptable.

A broad reach of digital media platforms were able to create a community around such an unique feeling, and foster its growth within a decade — it’s not a reach to state that without these forms of media, the ASMR genre would not exist today. The exponential growth of ASMR proves the power of modern media platforms and how each one can work together to create a worldwide sensation such as this one.

Without digital media, plenty of humans would’ve been sitting around tapping on objects and feeling isolated; media has a way of ensuring humans that they’re not ever alone — someone’s always there to whisper in their ear. Literally.

works cited:

Gallagher, Rob. “Eliciting Euphoria Online: The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture.” Film Criticism, vol. 40, no. 2, 2016, doi:10.3998/fc.13761232.0040.202.

Cline, John. “What Is ASMR and Why Are People Watching These Videos?” Psychology Today,  Sussex Publishers, 26 Sept. 2018, www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sleepless-in-america/201809/what-is-asmr-and-why-are-people-watching-these-videos.

Long, Rebecca. “Why Are Whispering Videos so Popular on YouTube? The Quiet World of
ASMR.” Medium, Series of the Week, 9 Nov. 2017,
medium.com/seriesoftheweek/why-are-whispering-videos-so-popular-on-youtube-the-quiet-world-of-asmr-27e0e9e62b49.

Richard, Craig. “History of ASMR.” ASMR University, 14 Apr. 2018, asmruniversity.com/history-of-asmr/.

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creative project statement

creative project statement

For my creative project, I attempted to create my own ASMR video — note the word “attempted”. After watching countless hours of ASMR videos, formally referred to as autonomous sensory meridian response, I assumed that making my own content would be relatively easy. My goal was to make a sound assortment, a type of video where the ASMRtist or content creator would include a handful of triggers (such as tapping, face brushing, etc.). Between all of the different types of videos, I felt that a sound assortment would be the easiest for a beginner like me. I wanted to submit a serious, genuine ASMR video with triggers that may actually work for some viewers. As one can see after viewing my video, I wasn’t successful in doing so.

While I did rent a camera from the media lab on campus, I ended up just using my iPhone 8, and in my opinion, the quality was impressive. This made me realize how easy it is for anyone to put themselves in front of a camera and say they’re an ASMRtist. Within a couple of minutes, I set my iPhone up on a windowsill, used a wrapper from the snack I had just eaten and grabbed a makeup brush. That was the only setup required. I was eager to start filming, and never being a camera shy person, I assumed this was going to take only a couple minutes — I was very, very wrong. To me, I’m not a very serious, warm/motherly type person, which I think is what makes an ASMRtist successful. I also am just not great at it, honestly. I constantly was making sounds that were too abrasive or would hit the microphone the wrong way. I ended up spending thirty minutes trying to film myself doing ASMR because I couldn’t stop laughing. The longest, straight-faced clip I filmed was around fifteen seconds long.

This was eye-opening to me; while my goal initially was to submit a serious video, I decided to create a project showing my personal experience trying ASMR. This wasn’t to mock ASMR or show “how silly it is” — it was the exact opposite. Through my research this semester of ASMR and the community around it, I had started to build respect for the ASMRtists who genuinely use their videos to help viewers with insomnia, anxiety, etc. Creating this project solidified the respect I have for ASMRtists. I love creating media and being in front of a camera, but to commit time out of one’s life, find objects to use, set up a pleasing backdrop and comfort viewers is a lot.

My final project topic covers what ASMR is and how digital media supports and stigmatizes it. Creating my video strengthened this statement not only because of how accessible creating media was, but also because of the positive reactions I received from the class/peers — because media has shed light on ASMR through videos or memes, people weren’t judging at all. In reference to a specific media platform, I cover YouTube in my essay and how it fosters fan base growth while letting basically anyone with a camera be a YouTuber. This proved true when I simply set my iPhone up and started filming. Digital media in this current age makes platforms accessible to any human with Internet access, something that I feel we’ve touched on a lot in class all semester. Overall, I found through creating this project that because of the support media has given ASMR and the advancements of platforms like YouTube, I was able to comfortably and successfully (kind of) make a video.

final website self-assessment

final website self-assessment

  • What changes did you make over the course of the semester, and why?

The main changes I’ve made this semester are mostly aesthetics; I’ve changed the background color multiple times and the general set up of the posts until I was happy. I originally wanted to have a gray/light green setup, but I naturally love pinks so I couldn’t stay away for too long! I also had to figure out the menu situation and play around with that.

  • How did your website end up versus how you first imagined it?

I’m not shocked with how it ended up. My general aesthetic as a person is pastel colors, and I ideally just wanted a simple setup — which I feel I achieved. As mentioned earlier, I was imagining doing a monotone sort of website but knew deep down I would change it.

  • Were you able to accomplish the goals for your website that you expressed at the beginning of the semester?

In the first assessment, I had said:

I’d love to really make the website into my own little world of ideas and projects. The idea of having one website for an entire semester of work is satisfying, and my goal would be to make it an enriched and fulfilling site.

I think that I achieved this to an extent; while it’s nice to have one solid place for all of my work towards my project, I think I envisioned posting a lot more about general media things than I did.

  • Was making a website easier or harder than you expected?

Fairly easy. I struggled with the menu/certain WordPress tools, but figured it out.

  • How will you use this website (or similar websites) in the future?

I think I’ll keep using it for future media studies classes out of convenience, and down the line when I have to apply to jobs, I may clean it up a bit more and attach a link in my application. I also used to use Wix in high school, and feel like this is a better website for personal sites. I miss blogging/personal narrative writing, and using WordPress has inspired me to start writing again.

rough draft: ASMR research paper

rough draft: ASMR research paper

ASMR Research Paper Outline (rough draft)

    1. Introduction
      1. 2011, I was looking for a relaxing video when I couldn’t sleep and stumbled across a nurse roleplay video. I was weirded out by it but the strangeness only inspired me to do further research
        1. After reading into it, I found that the video I watched was ASMR — autonomous sensory meridian response
      2. I became fascinated with the few ASMR videos I could find on YouTube
        1. Felt an extreme embarrassment for watching them (never once told anyone about it until recently when I felt that it was less taboo/socially acceptable), so late at night I would go on Google’s incognito mode to watch them
        2. To me, it was so taboo that a stranger on the Internet was whispering into a camera for “my enjoyment” (ASMRtist’s words, not mine)
      3. Digital media is responsible for the birth and growth of ASMR; forums and online communities banded together to formally create it, platforms like YouTube fostered the growth, and large social sites such as Twitter popularized it.
        1. Different types of digital media were used together in order to make this sub community into a popular part of pop culture.
        2. It’s regularly seen nowadays in Twitter memes, interviews with celebrities, and on “reaction videos” on YouTube
          1. twitter meme: https://twitter.com/ikindasnapped/status/1027654502495727617?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.buzzfeed.com%2Fsamstryker%2Fasmr-girl-becomes-a-meme
          2. celebrity interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXaBom7KKmU&t=479s
          3. youtubers react to ASMR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4H1eo1p00iA
      4. What is ASMR?
        1. Autonomous sensory meridian response. It is described by Cline as “describes the experience of tingling sensations in the crown of the head, in response to a range of audio-visual triggers such as whispering, tapping, and hand movements”.
          1. It is relevant to point out that this formal definition doesn’t include those simply feel euphoria or are relaxed by ASMR videos. Most people do feel some kind of tingles from these videos, but there is a good amount of the community that just likes watching them.
    2. The Birth of ASMR
      1. Though I claim to have been around since the start of ASMR, in reality, the birth of ASMR dates back to 2007 (Richard)

 

  • Weird sensation feels good was a forum on steadyhealth.com started which through conversations online formally birthed ASMR

 

    1. The term itself wasn’t coined until 2010, when Jennifer Allen felt ASMR-like sensations, and after finding the forum and seeing the coined term being sexuall related — attention indudced head organsm — she created a better term (Long)
      1. she revolutionized ASMR’s community; those who felt sensations now had a formal way to communicate about their triggers and feelings, and content creators started labeling their videos as ASMR
      2. Long’s article on Medium states that Allen gave people a language to discuss ASMR with — sparked conversations and gave a platform for ASMR fans to chat
    2. “There is no record of ASMR existing until a few years ago because people had no way of talking about it.” (Long)
  1. Growth of ASMR + technological advances
    1. After the initial formalization of ASMR on online forums, Reddit, Facebook and blogs, ASMR started to grow steadily.
      1. Richard’s website on the history of ASMR explains that after the first wave of forums and subreddit posts made, Long created a Facebook page for members of the community (Richard)
      2. Journals, articles, and even a full on documentary were all produced; by 2015, the first book about ASMR was published (Richard).
    2. While smaller scale, communally based platforms were used to birth ASMR, broader spreads of media such as research journals, documentaries and books started to attract more ASMR fans and content creators alike.
      1. While in the beginnings of ASMR, YouTubers like Gentle Whispering ASMR and Heather Feather dominated the platform, the steady exponential growth of this community enticed plenty of people to get a camera and start whispering.
    3. YouTube is obviously the main site that supports ASMR because it’s the most accessible and sensible platform to post ASMR videos on.
      1. “In this context it makes sense that web users increasingly look to platforms like YouTube for solace, affirmation and relaxation” (Gallagher)
      2. YouTube is accessible, easy to use, free and after entering four words into the search engine, a media user is treated to thousands of videos.
    4. Technological advancements
      1. Early ASMR videos were simple; I can recall around 2011 watching sound assortments with dim house lighting and the ASMRtist using whatever was around the house. However, a simple search on YouTube currently will show numerous high quality videos — professional lighting, microphones with fake ears built in for the sole use of ASMRtists.
        1. technology and digital software adapted to ASMR and found ways to improve the quality
        2. while some ASMRtists still do use their iPhone and just go in their bathroom to tap on objects, others make a production out of it, filming for hours in front of professional lighting, order props strictly for a roleplay, etc.
          1. best example I can think of it ASMRrequests, who made one of the first out of the box and high quality videos and racked up 3 million views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oapgiZc5i-g
      2. ASMR videos evolved and improved because of the communities formed on digital media platforms such as Reddit, where in Eliciting Euphoria Online: The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture, Gallagher discusses the upvote/downvote feature on the r/ASMR page in order to rank the most effective videos
        1. content creators could use this platform to understand what their viewers want to see from them — effective feedback was collected all on one digital site, Reddit
        2. “This ability is measured via feedback mechanisms (comments, views, “likes,” upvotes) linking audiences to uploaders and ASMRtists. Such feedback helps ASMRtists to feel out the kinds of input likeliest to elicit the desired output and tune their aesthetic strategies accordingly.” (Gallagher)
  2. Recent popularization
    1. The recent exposure seen in 2018 and 2017 on popular sites such as Twitter has actually helped grow the ASMR community even more.
      1. I personally would’ve expected that with the memes created in reaction to the more unique ASMR videos would make the community even more taboo or judged — yet the opposite happened. People are now openly talking about it, ASMRtists have popular Instagram and Twitter accounts, and those who might’ve felt uncomfortable to create now can.
    2. Twitter memes
      1. https://twitter.com/likesmoth/status/1027414331439423489?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.buzzfeed.com%2Fsamstryker%2Fasmr-girl-becomes-a-meme
      2. https://twitter.com/the_myleg_fish/status/1027726064703995905?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.buzzfeed.com%2Fsamstryker%2Fasmr-girl-becomes-a-meme
      3. https://twitter.com/jackhoward/status/1042908859474608128?lang=en
    3. Conclusion (ties into the current day view of ASMR due to the recent exposure)
      1. I personally feel more comfortable discussing it with my friends; just a few years ago, I’d be mortified to be seen watching a video or talking about it. But because of the attention that celebrities have given it, memes made, or general jokes that content creators make about it, fans and ASMRtists alike are able to feel more comfortable in the community.
      2. Digital media evolved this community rather quickly; with the first forum posted in 2007, ASMR has been growing for eleven years.
        1. this just goes to show the power of modern media platforms and how each one can work together — without digital media, plenty of people would’ve assumed they were the only ones who felt a tingly, relaxed feeling with certain triggers

 

Works Cited

Cline, John. “What Is ASMR and Why Are People Watching These Videos?” Psychology Today,  Sussex Publishers, 26 Sept. 2018,

www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sleepless-in-america/201809/what-is-asmr-and-why-

are-people-watching-these-videos.

 

Gallagher, Rob. “Eliciting Euphoria Online: The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture.” Film

Criticism, vol. 40, no. 2, 2016, doi:10.3998/fc.13761232.0040.202.

 

Long, Rebecca. “Why Are Whispering Videos so Popular on YouTube? The Quiet World of

ASMR.” Medium, Series of the Week, 9 Nov. 2017,

medium.com/seriesoftheweek/why-are-whispering-videos-so-popular-on-youtube-the-quiet-world-of-asmr-27e0e9e62b49.

 

Richard, Craig. “History of ASMR.” ASMR University, 14 Apr. 2018,

asmruniversity.com/history-of-asmr/.

about this site

about this site

my name is alice, and i’m a student interested in media studies + all things surrounding it! this website is my little world to put any work related posts into. currently, i’m working on a semester-long project in my FILM208 class focused on ASMR (those videos with the people whispering to the camera) and the relationship it has with digital media.

creative project — rough draft outline

creative project — rough draft outline

For my creative project, I plan to make my own ASMR video to go along with my study of ASMR and media’s effect on it. The outline below covers the project pitch I’m making, explaining that I’m going to specifically be creating a “sound assortment” video. This is one that is informal, letting the ASMRtist pick and choose some triggers to implement. I’ll start by explaining ASMR itself and the kind of video I’m choosing to attempt, while also stating what my expectations are for creating the video.

I’m interested in seeing just how easy it is nowadays for anyone to pick up a camera and create ASMR; with all of the media exposure and increasing tolerance recently, I feel like it’s relatively easy to become an ASMRtist. I’ll be setting expectations before I start filming my ASMR video, then after, briefly explain my experience.

The purpose of the video isn’t really to give tingles (though if someone gets them, okay!), but to experience the other side of ASMR videos for myself. With the increase of digital media in our lives, getting connected and becoming a content creator is insanely easy. I’m curious to see if there’s going to be any challenge in creating a legitimate and serious ASMR video (meaning I need to keep a straight face!).

I plan on starting to film the video this week. I feel that it won’t be too time consuming to film, because I’m making a shorter sound assortment, and plan on editing it over the weekend. My main effort will be going into the research paper, which will require much more work and time.

— creative project, rough draft outline —

  1. explain ASMR in a soft spoken/whispering voice
    1. quick explanation: ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response, basically explaining the tingles or relaxation one would get from a video like this. ASMR isn’t just tingles, but an euphoric kind of state of relaxation that one enters. There’s thousands and thousands of these videos on YouTube, ranging from role plays, sound assortments, and plenty of others. Content creators, or as they’re known, ASMRtists, use a variety of tactics in order to relax the viewer.
      1. throughout this, i may put a voiceover over clips of popular ASMR YouTubers such as Heather Feather or Gentle Whispering ASMR, doing role plays, sound assortments, etc.
    2. my expectation for creating my own ASMR
      1. i feel like it’ll come naturally to me as i start to make sound triggers because i’ve spent so long watching ASMR. i’ve already started to just tap on objects absentmindedly while i work, so i feel like this experience won’t be strange.
      2. also, because of the increased exposure social media has given to ASMR, i feel like it isn’t going to be too difficult to create a video. my friends and i have joked around with ASMR before, so it’ll be relatively natural to be in front of a camera
  2. introduce the video i’ll be making
    1. sound assortment
      1. I’m going to be attempting to make a sound assortment, which is a popular video plenty of ASMRtists make. It’s simple — it’s a video that can be quick or long of a handful of different triggers. I’m going to be trying 5 different triggers: tapping, brushing, tracing, finger movements and flashlight movements.
    2. links inspiring my video
      1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiYiH9ymjm0 (anoASMR)
      2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXShzMV0vTg (Heather Feather)
      3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6RhpPDHXH4 (Gentle Whispering ASMR)
    3. what triggers am i using in the video?
      1. tapping on binders/books
      2. brushing the microphone with makeup brush
      3. tracing stickers on my water bottle
      4. finger movements/motions
      5. flashlight movement
  3. closing the video
    1. explaining how the process of creating ASMR went for me — strange? easier than i expected? fun? etc.
annotated bibliography

annotated bibliography

Alice Bodge

Dr. Allison

FILM208

28 October 2018

Annotated Bibliography

Ahuja, Nitin K.”“It Feels Good to Be Measured”: Clinical Role-Play, Walker Percy, and the

Tingles.” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, vol. 56 no. 3, 2013, pp. 442-451. Project

MUSE, doi:10.1353/pbm.2013.0022

Ahuja looks into ASMR and its core concepts, comparing the tingles one

experiences to Walker Percy’s novel Love in the Ruins. These both have similar traits; the

novel alluding to ASMR-type tingles that the modern viewer experiences. He summarizes

the novel and how it relates to modern day tingles, proving that by no means is ASMR a

“new feeling”. Ahuja brings a unique view to the table that I found useful, he having

experience in the medical field. Ahuja looks into the medical ASMR roleplays,

discussing why exactly these may relax viewers and how it relates to the real world

tingles one feels at the doctor’s office. I wanted to utilize this source because of his

personal experience with ASMR and the content that it can be based on. I also found the

comparison to an older novel interesting and a noteworthy point.

 

ASMR, Gentle Whispering. “What Is ASMR?” YouTube, YouTube, 15 Dec. 2014,

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kb27NHO_ubg.

This additional source is a video made by one of the most (if not the most)

popular ASMRtists right now; Maria or Gentle Whispering created a video explaining

what ASMR is for those who are new to the community. Gentle Whispering has been

around since the early stages of ASMR, and has built up a  sizable community of fans.

While these kinds of explanation videos aren’t rare, I feel that hers is the best and most

helpful for an outside viewer. She concisely explains what ASMR is, the feelings that

come with it and how one gets triggers. The video is only ~2 minutes, yet has racked up

6,895,353 views currently — showing that many have come to the video for a brief yet

helpful explanation.

 

Gallagher, Rob. “Eliciting Euphoria Online: The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture.” Film

Criticism, vol. 40, no. 2, 2016, doi:10.3998/fc.13761232.0040.202.

In The Aesthetics of ‘ASMR’ Video Culture, Gallagher goes into detail of the

logistics in ASMR; specifically, he goes into the technology behind the sounds made as

well as how Reddit became a platform to rate and overall improve the videos that

“Asmrtists”, ASMR content creators, are making. Gallagher’s research on Reddit in

particular was interesting; a subreddit for ASMR was created early on in ASMR’s history,

but the platform is used to share the best videos made. Upvoting and downvoting is used,

not to judge how enjoyable/cool a video was, but to judge how many tingles it can give

the viewer. Instead of using Reddit simply to share cool or fun ASMR videos, members

took it a step further by voting on the most efficient ones. This will be a great addition to

my project, because it looks into a subcommunity that fostered the growth of ASMR by

making a standard for videos to be made by.

 

John, Cline. “What Is ASMR and Why Are People Watching These Videos?” Psychology Today,

Sussex Publishers, 26 Sept. 2018,

www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sleepless-in-america/201809/what-is-asmr-and-why-

are-people-watching-these-videos.

In this source on Psychology Today, Dr. John Cline goes into the dictionary

definition of ASMR, and puts into official wording the symptoms and feelings one with

ASMR gets. It is a concise explanation that goes into the psychological effects as well,

Cline understanding the bliss some viewers feel from certain triggers. He also goes into

his personal experience with ASMR and how he first discovered it; he then finishes off

discussing studies and ASMR research. I chose this source because it is a straightforward

and well written article with research to support the statements. Though I am quite

familiar with ASMR, Cline’s article is a backbone to my project due to its clear

explanations.

 

Long, Rebecca. “Why Are Whispering Videos so Popular on YouTube? The Quiet World of

ASMR.” Medium, Series of the Week, 9 Nov. 2017,

medium.com/seriesoftheweek/why-are-whispering-videos-so-popular-on-youtube-the-quiet-world-of-asmr-27e0e9e62b49.

This written source by Rebecca Long on Medium gives a brief yet helpful summary of

ASMR, and goes more into the relevance of the community and how it gained traction.

Long in particular pinpoints specific ways that the ASMR community has grown — I

appreciated this because most of the other news outlets and articles didn’t go into detail.

She also concludes with an overall look at ASMR and how it proves the power of social

media, stating that “there is no record of ASMR existing until a few years ago because

people had no way of talking about it”. Long’s article helps back up my project and the

idea that social media made an otherwise in the dark community shine.

 

Poerio, Giulia Lara, et al. “More than a Feeling: Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response

(ASMR) Is Characterized by Reliable Changes in Affect and Physiology.” Plos One, vol.

13, no. 6, 2018, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0196645.

This article looks into the scientific side to ASMR, the authors determined to

conduct empirical research on the tingles and physiological effects it has on the viewer.

The article summarizes ASMR and the main concept of it, while explaining the scientific

sides of the phenomenon and why so many people now watch/listen to it. Two large-scale

survey/studies were done on participants, which gave ASMR a foundation of legitimate

scientific studies — they had participants watch specific ASMR videos, while measuring

what triggers worked for them and the feelings said triggers gave. While my project isn’t

focused on the scientific side of ASMR, I feel that it is relevant and helps explain to a

reader what ASMR truly is about. The authors lay down a scientific foundation to explain

ASMR on, giving it more clarity to the average viewer.

 

Richard, Craig. “History of ASMR.” ASMR University, 14 Apr. 2018,

asmruniversity.com/history-of-asmr/.

This website is ASMR’s formal platform for information. Dr. Craig Richard runs it, giving

plenty of resources and explanations available to anyone curious about ASMR. In

particular, I’m interested in using the History of ASMR timeline that Richard created,

detailing the birth of the community and how it has grown into the success it is today.

This is extremely useful because while I’ve been around since the start of ASMR, I had no

idea how it came to be. Richard explains the origins from 2008 until present day, giving

names and links to pages, forums, platforms and etc. created all through the ASMR

community. This source will help link my experience with its foundations.

 

Roy, Jessica. “The Internet Gives Me ‘Brain Orgasms’ and Maybe You Can Get Them Too.”

Time, Time, 19 Nov. 2013,

newsfeed.time.com/2013/11/18/the-internet-gives-me-brain-orgasms-and-maybe-you-can-get-them-too/.

This article was published on Time, and written by a woman who experiences full on

ASMR (the tingles and euphoria). She gives a concise explanation of what ASMR is, her

experience with it, and others’ definitions as well. I felt that this was a useful source for

my project because of her hands on experience with ASMR since the earliest stages: this

article was published in 2013, roughly two years after I initially discovered it. I felt that

having another opinion of an ASMR viewer who’s been with the community since the

early stages would benefit the depth of my paper.